Fall Migration Bird Walk

Speaker: 
Alan Messer
Sat, October 8th, 2011 | 10:00 am

Event details

Journey with wildlife artist Alan Messer to some of the most magical places in Central Park’s wooded Ramble, discovering along the way both resident and migrating birds. Delight in the fall warblers and sparrows along with late-migrating nuthatches, finches and visiting raptors. Walking tours are limited to 35 guests per tour. Please buy tickets in advance.

Audubon’s Aviary: Part I of the Complete Flock

Mar 8 2013 - May 19 2013

For more information on Audubon’s Aviary: Parts Unknown (Part II of The Complete Flock), open March 21-May 26, 2014, click here.
 
To celebrate the sesquicentennial of the New-York Historical Society’s purchase of the Audubon avian watercolors and the the release of the lavishly illustrated book Audubon’s Aviary: The Original Watercolors for “The Birds of America”―published by the New-York Historical Society and Skira/Rizzoli and winner of a 2013 New York Book Show Award—the New-York Historical Society plans a sweeping three-part exhibition to showcase every masterpiece from its unparalleled collection of John James Audubon’s preparatory watercolor models for the sumptuous double-elephant-folio print edition of The Birds of America (1827–38). Over three years Audubon’s Aviary: The Complete Flock (Parts I–III), will feature all 474 stunning avian watercolors by Audubon in the collection, alongside engaging state-of-the-art media installations that will provide a deeper understanding of the connection between art and nature.

John James Audubon (1785-1851), Great Egret (Ardea alba), 1821. Watercolor, graphite, pastel, gouache, white lead pigment, black ink, and black chalk with selective glazing on paper, laid on card. New-York Historical Society, Purchased for the Society by public subscription from Mrs. John J. Audubon, 1863.18.30

The trilogy Audubon’s Aviary: The Complete Flock is a once-in-a-lifetime series (2013–2015) that will explore the evolution of Audubon’s dazzling watercolors in the order in which they were engraved. Visitors to New-York Historical will have the unique opportunity to view these national treasures sequentially and in their entirety for the first time—the same way his original subscribers received the Havell plates.

Hudson River Birds: In Celebration of the Quadricentennial of Henry Hudson’s Voyage

Jul 13 2009 - Oct 11 2009

The New-York Historical Society, which holds all 435 dazzling preparatory watercolors for John James Audubon’s The Birds of America (1827-38), continues to showcase a thematic selection of these masterpieces in an installation in the Luce Center, rotating them to ensure that these national treasures remain available to future generations.

Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus), Havell plate no. 199, ca.1833, John James Audubon, 1785-1851, Watercolor, graphite, pastel, black chalk, gouache, and black ink on paper, laid on card, Purchased for the Society by public subscription from Mrs. John J. Audubon, 1863.17.199

To thematically dovetail with the 400 year celebration of Henry Hudson's historic voyage of discovery, and the exhibition Dutch New York between East and West: The World of Margrieta van Varick at the Bard Graduate Center Gallery organized in collaboration with the New-York Historical Society, five of Audubon's watercolors of birds who perch or live along the Hudson River are displayed. One, the Hudsonian Godwit, is even named after a namesake of the explorer's and is found along the river during migration.

Lincoln’s and Other Sparrows for The Birds of America

May 13 2009 - Dec 3 2009

The New-York Historical Society, which holds all 435 dazzling preparatory watercolors for John James Audubon's The Birds of America (1827-38), continues to showcase a thematic selection of these masterpieces, rotating them to ensure that these national treasures remain available to future generations.

Lincoln's Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii), Havell plate no. 193, 1833, John James Audubon, 1785-1851, Watercolor, graphite, pastel, and gouache with touches of black ink and selective glazing on paper, laid on card, Credit Line: Purchased for the Society by public subscription from Mrs. John J. Audubon, 1863.17.193

Sparrows: Good Things Come in Small Packages

Special Collections >

Teaser: 

The New-York Historical Society Museum collection numbers over 60,000 objects, including works of art and artifacts spanning four centuries. Among its holdings are particularly rich and diverse collections that illuminate the historical and cultural life of New York City and the nation.

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Paintings >

Teaser: 

The New-York Historical Society houses an outstanding collection of over twenty-five hundred American paintings—primarily portraits, genre scenes and landscapes—dating from the colonial period through the twentieth century, as well as a select number of European works. It includes the personal collection of the New York merchant and pioneering art patron Luman Reed, as well as the collection of Robert L. Stuart, another nineteenth-century New York philanthropist and art collector.

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Drawings >

Teaser: 

One of the jewels in the Museum’s crown is its drawing collection, numbering over 8,000 sheets. Collected since 1816, this distinctive trove is the country’s earliest public drawing collection. It is also one of the finest, whose strength resides in its unparalleled late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century material to furnish a comprehensive survey of American art from its inception, dominated by European artists, up through the 1860s, by which time native-born artists had asserted an American identity.

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Highlights >

Teaser: 

The New-York Historical Society Museum and Library houses a treasure trove of materials relating to the founding of our country, the history of art in America, and the history of New York and its people. The Museum houses more than 60,000 works and artifacts, including fine art, decorative art, historical artifacts, and ephemera. Fine art holdings include renowned Hudson River School landscapes; masterpieces of colonial and later portraiture; John James Audubon’s watercolors for The Birds of America; an encyclopedic collection of sculpture; and much more.

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Luce Center >

Teaser: 

The Henry Luce III Center for the Study of American Culture will be closed for renovations from July 28, 2014 through December 2016. Please check back in the fall for details of our exciting new galleries and installations.

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