Radical Hospitality

Feb 10 2004 - Oct 17 2004

Radical Hospitality will draw upon artifacts, photographs, banners and posters, children's art and video to reveal the story of how ordinary people pitched in to provide comfort, support and amenities to the rescue and recovery workers at the site of the destroyed World Trade Center. Organized geographically, the exhibition starts in midtown Manhattan with the supply distribution centers hurriedly created at the Jacob Javits Center and the piers along the Hudson River, then travels downtown on West Street along the Hero Highway to Point Thank You at Christopher Street, where well-wishers cheered and held up hand-lettered and decorated signs expressing their appreciation as rescue vehicles traveled to and from the site. It then goes to Nino's Restaurant on Canal Street, which opened its doors around the clock and supplied the recovery workers with food, drink, and a place to unwind from their grueling task, to St. Paul's Chapel, a spiritual and physical haven for the workers, to Ground Zero and the ceremonies that marked the end of the recovery and clean-up operations.

Approximately 50 objects bear witness to the incredible outpouring of support for New York's rescue and recovery workers in the months following September 11, from a canvas banner hung on the fence at St. Paul's and signed by recovery workers, volunteers, and people visiting groun; to the tags of bomb-sniffing dogs Ajax and Laika; to a large hand-painted sign reading "Welcome to Point Thank You".

The Games We Played: American Board and Table Games from the Liman Collection Gift

Displayed in ongoing, four-month rotations

The Games We Played presents a rotating selection of board and table games from the Liman Collection, an extraordinary collection of more than 500 examples donated to New-York Historical by Ellen Liman in 2000. These games, which entertained families from the 1840s to the 1920s, offer a fascinating window on the values, beliefs and aspirations of middle-class Americans. During the period, families embraced leisure pursuits in the home and encouraged their children to play games that would develop skills and provide moral instruction. At the same time, advances in chromolithography allowed board game manufacturers, like New York City-based McLoughlin Brothers, to produce sumptuous, eye-catching games at affordable prices.

McLoughlin Bros., Game of District Messenger Boy or Merit Rewarded, 1886. Cardboard, wood, lead. The New-York Historical Society, The Liman Collection, 2000.335

New York Foundling Hospital Images

Teaser: 

This digital collection consists of selected images from the New York Foundling Hospital. The Foundling opened in 1869, under the auspices of the Sisters of Charity, as a Catholic haven for abandoned babies. It was one of the principal institutions sending children to live with families in the country, in a program known today as the "orphan train." The collection documents the programs and administration of the New York Foundling Hospital, 1869–2009, and the St. Agatha Home for Children, which operated separately from the Foundling beginning in 1884, before merging into the Foundling in 1977. The collection has processed and a finding aid, or guide to the collection, can be found here. Images include photographs of Foundling facilities and activities, reproductions of pamphlets, and reproductions of notes left with children entrusted to the Foundling.
 
Click here to view the full collection.
 

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Children's Aid Society Images

Teaser: 

This site on Flickr highlights a selection of images from the historical records of the Children's Aid Society. The charitable organization was founded in New York City in 1853 to aid, educate and provide lodging for poor children in the city, and/or to place them in foster homes or with employers outside of the city. The entire collection has been rehoused and processed and a finding aid, or guide to the collection, can be located here. The select images portray children participating in activities at CAS facilities as well as children leaving on the "Orphan Trains." Some annual reports, personal diaries, intake volumes, broadsides and pamphlets have also been included.
 
Click here to view the full collection.
 

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Student and Class Visit

Teaser: 

We ask that students at the high school level or younger visit the Patricia D. Klingenstein Library with an adult, such as a teacher or parent, and that the teacher or parent call ahead to discuss briefly the nature of the student's project with a reference librarian. The Klingenstein Library's research collections are not geared primarily to school history projects and students should undertake secondary source research prior to visiting this library. Please contact the Education Department if you're a school teacher and would like to bring your class to the New-York Historical Society.

Teachers of college and graduate school classes who would like to schedule a class visit to the Klingenstein Library should contact Nina Nazionale at nnazionale@nyhistory.org

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Student and Class Visits

Teaser: 

We ask that students at the high-school level or younger visit the Patricia D. Klingenstein Library with an adult, such as a teacher or parent, and that the teacher or parent call ahead to discuss briefly the nature of the student's project with a reference librarian. The Klingenstein Library's research collections are not geared primarily to school history projects and students should undertake secondary source research prior to visiting this library. Please contact the Education Department if you're a schoolteacher and would like to bring your class to the New-York Historical Society.
Teachers of college and graduate-school classes who would like to schedule a class visit to the Klingenstein Library should contact Nina Nazionale at nnazionale@nyhistory.org.
 

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High School Internships

High School Internships

“I met a lot of new and interesting people. I successfully completed a research project and comfortably presented in front of an audience. I have gotten to know and love this museum setting.” – Tyler Lee, 2012 Student Historian

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Private Workshops

Private Professional Development

Professional development workshops are available on-site at the New-York Historical Society or museum staff can come to schools. Book one of the below content-based programs for your group of teachers today! All programs can be crafted as a two-hour workshop or extended to a half- or full-day program.

To schedule training for your school or for more information, contact us at teacherPD@nyhistory.org.

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P-Credit Courses

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The New-York Historical Society offers DOE-approved Professional-Credit courses each July. These classes meet for 36 hours (Monday-Saturday, 10 am–5 pm) and carry three credits that can be applied toward teachers' 30-and-above salary differential. Courses will be listed and registration will be available on the After School Professional Development Program's site when the summer course catalog becomes available, typically in late spring. Courses fill up quickly, so register early!

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Saturday Academy

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Saturday Academy

“I had an amazing time at Saturday Academy, learning new things and making new friends from all around New York City.”
- Saturday Academy student, Fall 2012

 

 

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