Museum Holiday Schedule

The New-York Historical Society Museum will be open Wednesday, December 24, 10am-3pm and will reopen Friday, December 26, 10am-8pm. For details, please visit our calendar.

New York City Paper Dolls: Bill Cunningham

Sun, March 16th, 2014 | 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Free with Museum Admission

How would you dress up to stand in front of Federal Hall? How about the Empire State Building? The Washington Mews? Inspired by the exhibition Bill Cunningham: Façades, families are invited to choose their favorite New York City landmark and decorate their own matching paper doll in this drop-in art making program. We’ll have images of historical paper dolls from our collection for families to see as well. Recommended for ages 4–10.

Paradise Planned: The Garden Suburb and the Modern City

Speaker: 
Robert A.M. Stern
Tue, March 25th, 2014 | 6:30 pm

EVENT DETAILS

The planned garden suburb is a phenomenon that originated in England in the late-18th century, then quickly spread to the United States and beyond in the 19th. Renowned architect Robert A.M. Stern discusses the evolution of these bucolic settings and the important lessons they hold for the future of our towns and cities.

Macy's Sunday Story Time: Spring!

Sun, March 3rd, 2013 | 11:30 am

Recommended for children ages 4–7.

It’s almost Spring—what will we do to prepare? Take out our lighter, cooler clothes! But what do animals do to get ready for the warmer weather? Join us to find out!

Snow Rabbit, Spring Rabbit: A Book of Changing Seasons by Il Sung Na
When Blue met Egg by Lindsay Ward

Support for the Macy's Sunday Story Hour provided by the Macy's Foundation.
 

Eastside vs. Westside

Speaker: 
Barry Lewis
Thu, April 18th, 2013 | 6:30 pm

Note: This event is sold out

 

EVENT DETAILS

By the end of the nineteenth century, Central Park West had become a bastion of middle class life and Fifth Avenue the boulevard of the very wealthy. Today the east side chateaux have almost all disappeared, but the middle class apartment buildings of the west side remain a vital part of the New York skyline. Join us for a colorful evening with Barry Lewis, whose Eastside vs. Westside lecture returns by popular demand.

Portraits of the City

Nov 11 2011 - May 28 2013

A group of approximately twenty paintings and two small sculptures offer visitors a chronological journey through highlights of the New-York Historical Society's rich collection of New York views, including historical images of the metropolis and richly allusive images of its inhabitants and their lives. The installation includes a selection of city views, beginning and ending with two monumental cityscapes, A Southeast Prospect of the City of New York from ca. 1756-1761 and Jacquette’s From World Trade Center, 1998. It features portraits of political and cultural figures such as DeWitt Clinton, who oversaw the development of the Erie Canal, and Katharine Cornell, the first lady of the American theater in the 1920s and 1930s. It also illuminates the everyday lives of city dwellers through such works as Thain’s Italian Block Party, 1922, and Blauvelt’s images of New Yorkers at work in the 1850s.

Victor Perelli (1899-1986), Empire State Building, N.Y.C., 1940. Oil on canvas. Gift of the Federal Works Agency, Works Projects Administration, 1940.978

Howard Thain's Eye: Discovering New York in the 1920s

Nov 11 2011 - Aug 19 2012

Howard Thain moved to New York in 1919, and he described how during the next decade he spent every moment he could in the streets recording the city and its people “who to my provincial eye seemed incredibly interesting and exotic.” His brief but prolific painting career perfectly coincided with New York’s tumultuous and booming period before the Great Depression. Thain’s contemplative paintings reveal him as a thoughtful observer of the city, writ both large and small.

Howard Thain (1891-1951), Park Avenue at 42nd Street, N.Y.C., 1927. Oil on canvas. New-York Historical Society, Gift of Mrs. Howard Thain, 1970.40

A disciple of American realism, Thain’s work carried on the tradition of the Ashcan School with its subjects from everyday city life, while anticipating the urban manifestation of the American Scene movement of the 1930s. His paintings often convey the stillness, anonymity, and architectonic solidity of Edward Hopper’s urban views of the period. However, Thain ranged over a greater variety of moods and subjects. He recorded the city’s gleaming architecture, its transportation hubs, its gathering places, and their inhabitants.

WWII & NYC

Oct 5 2012 - May 27 2013

The Second World War (1939–1945) was the most widespread, destructive, and consequential conflict in history. WWII & NYC is an account of how New York and its metropolitan region contributed to Allied victory. The exhibition also explores the captivating, sobering, and moving stories of how New Yorkers experienced and confronted the challenges of “total war.”
Want to see everything—from lectures to films to behind-the-scenes stories—related to WWII & NYC? Click here to visit the WWII & NYC site!

Irving Boyer, Prospect Park, ca. 1942–1944. Oil on academy board. The New-York Historical Society, Gift of Selwyn L. Boyer, from the Boyer Family Collection, 2002.49

When war broke out in 1939, New York was a cosmopolitan, heavily immigrant city, whose people had real stakes in the global conflict and strongly held opinions about whether or not to intervene. The attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 brought the U.S. into the war, and New York became the principal port of embarkation for the warfront.

Architectural Collections

Teaser: 

The Society's architectural collections include drawings, blueprints, renderings, photographs, correspondence, and business records. Most significant are its large holdings for individual architects or firms, including (in chronological order) John McComb, Jr.; Calvin Pollard; Alexander J. Davis; John B. Snook; George B. Post; McKim, Mead & White; and Cass Gilbert. These architects were all active in Manhattan and New York City buildings predominate, but their work includes many structures outside the city. More than 150 other locally and nationally prominent architects and engineers are also represented, generally by 10 or fewer drawings.

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Photograph Collections

Teaser: 

The extensive photograph collections are particularly strong in portraits and documentary images of New York-area buildings and street scenes from 1839 to 1945, although contemporary photography continues to be collected. The bulk of these images are arranged by location, or, for portraits, by sitter. Both professional and amateur photographers (many unidentified) are represented.

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Landmarks of New York

Apr 30 2009 - Jul 12 2009

An exhibition of 83 photographs documenting some of the most significant buildings and public parks in New York City will be on view at The New-York Historical Society from April 30 through July 12, 2009, in the exhibition Landmarks of New York. The exhibition has traveled to 82 countries under the sponsorship of the United States Department of State since 2006 and is now coming home to New York for its final showing. The photographs in the exhibition will then enter the collection of the New-York Historical Society, through a donation from the exhibition's curator, Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel. 

Brooklyn Bridge, 1867-83 Designated as a landmark August 24, 1967 Photograph by Laura Napier New-York Historical Society

An exhibition of 83 photographs documenting some of the most significant buildings and public parks in New York City will be on view at The New-York Historical Society from April 30 through July 12, 2009, in the exhibition Landmarks of New York. The exhibition has traveled to 82 countries under the sponsorship of the United States Department of State since 2006 and is now coming home to New York for its final showing.

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