Museum Holiday Schedule

The New-York Historical Society Museum will be open Wednesday, December 24, 10am-3pm and will reopen Friday, December 26, 10am-8pm. For details, please visit our calendar.

United States 1933 Double Eagle

On display is one of the most famous and storied coins in the world—the 1933 Double Eagle. The Double Eagle is on display in The Robert H. & Clarice Smith New York Gallery of American History. Designed by the renowned sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens, the coin features the figure of Liberty striding before the Capitol Building on its face and an eagle in flight on the reverse.

In 1933 the United States struck almost a half million twenty-dollar gold coins, commonly known as Double Eagles. At virtually the same time, in one of his first acts as President, Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an Executive Order banning the payout of gold, weaning the country off the gold standard. The 1933 Double Eagles, although legally made, became illegal to own and were never circulated. In 1934, two were sent to the Smithsonian Institution for posterity, and in February 1937 the rest were melted into gold bars and sent to Fort Knox—or so it seemed.

Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936)

Speaker: 
Ted Widmer
Fri, June 14th, 2013 | 7:00 pm

TICKETS

Admission to the film programs is free in conjunction with New-York Historical’s Pay-as-you-wish Friday Nights (6-8 PM). No advanced reservations are possible for these events. Tickets are distributed on a first-come, first-served basis beginning at 6 PM. Auditorium doors open at 6:30 PM (unless otherwise noted).

World War II and New York: Walking Tour of Lower Manhattan

Speaker: 
Cal Snyder
Lucy Oakley
Sun, June 2nd, 2013 | 11:00 am

Note: This event is sold out

 

EVENT DETAILS

From Battery Park to the Army Ocean Terminal, New York Harbor vividly records the city’s role in WWII. Join us to hear the story of the harbor and its people in wartime and explore how New York City remembers those who fought to protect the free world. Walking tours are limited to 35 guests per tour. Please buy tickets in advance.

Pacific War Turning Point: Midway or Guadalcanal?

Speaker: 
Richard B. Frank
Craig L. Symonds
Sat, June 8th, 2013 | 9:00 am - 12:00 pm

EVENT DETAILS

9 am — Registration and Continental Breakfast

Program includes two brief lectures followed by a discussion.

The Guns at Last Light: The War in Western Europe

Speaker: 
Rick Atkinson
Steve Coll (moderator)
Tue, May 21st, 2013 | 6:30 pm

Note: This event is sold out

 

EVENT DETAILS

D-Day marked the commencement of the final campaign of the European war. Two authors tell the tale of the riveting series of events from the brutal fight in Normandy, the liberation of Paris, the disaster that was Operation Market Garden, the horrific Battle of the Bulge, and finally the thrust to the heart of the Third Reich.

Those Angry Days: Roosevelt, Lindbergh, and America’s Fight Over World War II

Speaker: 
Lynne Olson
Tom Brokaw (moderator)
Thu, March 28th, 2013 | 6:30 pm

Note: This event is sold out.

 

EVENT DETAILS

At the center of the debate over American intervention in World War II were the two most famous men in America: President Franklin D. Roosevelt and aviator Charles Lindbergh. The stakes could not have been higher; the combatants were larger than life. Join us for a frank discussion of the bitter clash that divided the nation, with the future of democracy and the fate of the free world hanging in the balance.

WWII & NYC

The Second World War (1939–1945) was the most widespread, destructive, and consequential conflict in history. WWII & NYC is an account of how New York and its metropolitan region contributed to Allied victory. The exhibition also explores the captivating, sobering, and moving stories of how New Yorkers experienced and confronted the challenges of “total war.”

When war broke out in 1939, New York was a cosmopolitan, heavily immigrant city, whose people had real stakes in the global conflict and strongly held opinions about whether or not to intervene. The attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 brought the U.S. into the war, and New York became the principal port of embarkation for the warfront. The presence of troops, the inflow of refugees, the wartime industries, the dispatch of fleets, and the dissemination of news and propaganda from media outlets, changed New York, giving its customary commercial and creative bustle a military flavor.

WWII & NYC

Oct 5 2012 - May 27 2013

The Second World War (1939–1945) was the most widespread, destructive, and consequential conflict in history. WWII & NYC is an account of how New York and its metropolitan region contributed to Allied victory. The exhibition also explores the captivating, sobering, and moving stories of how New Yorkers experienced and confronted the challenges of “total war.”
Want to see everything—from lectures to films to behind-the-scenes stories—related to WWII & NYC? Click here to visit the WWII & NYC site!

Irving Boyer, Prospect Park, ca. 1942–1944. Oil on academy board. The New-York Historical Society, Gift of Selwyn L. Boyer, from the Boyer Family Collection, 2002.49

When war broke out in 1939, New York was a cosmopolitan, heavily immigrant city, whose people had real stakes in the global conflict and strongly held opinions about whether or not to intervene. The attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 brought the U.S. into the war, and New York became the principal port of embarkation for the warfront.

FDR’s Brain Trust and the Beginning of the New Deal

Nov 6 2009 - Mar 26 2010

In his search for a new national message during the 1932 presidential primary, FDR gathered around him a number of political, economic and legal scholars. The core of this group were Columbia University professors, who knew and trusted each other, and were willing to take risks and work long unpaid hours to promote a candidate that they believed could turn around a nation in crisis.

Irving Browning Buy My Apples, 1929 Gelatin Silver Print New-York Historical Society, Gift of Irving Browning.

Although at first a casual circle, the group became tightly organized after FDR's nomination. After the election, they were publicly christened the "Brain Trust," and became the central component of the New Deal. This exhibition will focus on the three key members of the Brain Trust—Raymond Moley, Rexford Tugwell, and Adolph Berle—and two of the New Deal cabinet members with whom they worked to bring about FDR's radical changes—Frances Perkins and Harry Hopkins.

Franklin, Eleanor, and the Four Freedoms

Speaker: 
William E. Leuchtenburg
William J. vanden Heuvel
Douglas Brinkley (Moderator)
Thu, March 31st, 2011 | 7:30 pm

In his State of the Union Address on January 6, 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt looked forward to a world in which everyone enjoyed four essential freedoms: freedom of speech and expression, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear. These values were central to both Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, who made it her personal mission to codify those rights in the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Experts discuss the speech and its far-reaching influence, and also delve into this extraordinary couple’s influence on one another.

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