Museum Open Monday

The New-York Historical Society Museum will be open Monday, December 22. For details, please visit our calendar.

Three Days at Gettysburg, Part II

Speaker: 
James M. McPherson
John F. Marszalek
Harold Holzer (moderator)
Wed, May 8th, 2013 | 6:30 pm

Note: This event is sold out

 

EVENT DETAILS

In July 1863, Union and Confederate troops met in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania and in three days forever changed the course of American history. Three of America’s most renowned Civil War historians discuss one of the bloodiest and most haunting battles of the American Civil War.

Seward: Lincoln’s Indispensable Man

Speaker: 
Walter Stahr
Louis P. Masur (moderator)
Tue, March 19th, 2013 | 6:30 pm

Note: This event is sold out

 

EVENT DETAILS

William Henry Seward was one of the most important Americans of the nineteenth century: progressive governor of New York, outspoken federal senator, secretary of state during the Civil War and its aftermath, and a target of the assassins who killed Lincoln. Join us for an illuminating conversation about a complex and pivotal figure, Lincoln’s closest friend and adviser, and an early architect of America’s empire.

The Patriarch, Part II: Joe and Jack Kennedy

Speaker: 
David Nasaw
Tue, March 12th, 2013 | 6:30 pm

EVENT DETAILS

Celebrated historian David Nasaw returns to continue his discussion of Joseph P. Kennedy, the patriarch of America’s greatest political dynasty. In part two, Professor Nasaw focuses on Kennedy’s relationship with his son John F. Kennedy, who resurrected the family’s political reputation and captured the imagination of a generation.

SPEAKER BIOS

David Nasaw is a professor of history at the CUNY Graduate Center and the author of The Patriarch: The Remarkable Life and Turbulent Times of Joseph P. Kennedy.

My Share of the Task

Speaker: 
Stanley A. McChrystal
Walter Russell Mead (co-moderator)
Roger Berkowitz (co-moderator)
Sun, March 10th, 2013 | 5:00 pm

Co sponsor

Co-sponsored by the Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities at Bard College

WWII & NYC

The Second World War (1939–1945) was the most widespread, destructive, and consequential conflict in history. WWII & NYC is an account of how New York and its metropolitan region contributed to Allied victory. The exhibition also explores the captivating, sobering, and moving stories of how New Yorkers experienced and confronted the challenges of “total war.”

When war broke out in 1939, New York was a cosmopolitan, heavily immigrant city, whose people had real stakes in the global conflict and strongly held opinions about whether or not to intervene. The attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 brought the U.S. into the war, and New York became the principal port of embarkation for the warfront. The presence of troops, the inflow of refugees, the wartime industries, the dispatch of fleets, and the dissemination of news and propaganda from media outlets, changed New York, giving its customary commercial and creative bustle a military flavor.

Making Our Democracy Work: A Judge's View

Speaker: 
Stephen Breyer
Tue, May 31st, 2011 | 7:30 pm

How does the Constitution, an 18th-century document, relate to and dictate the laws of a 21st-century society? Through the analysis of past cases, including those concerning slavery, the Cherokee Indians, and detainees at Guantánamo Bay, Justice Stephen Breyer examines the Court’s arduous—and often turbulent—journey to establish its legitimacy as guardian of the Constitution. Having earned the public’s confidence, he expounds how the Court can continue promoting a workable democracy going forward.
 

WWII & NYC

Oct 5 2012 - May 27 2013

The Second World War (1939–1945) was the most widespread, destructive, and consequential conflict in history. WWII & NYC is an account of how New York and its metropolitan region contributed to Allied victory. The exhibition also explores the captivating, sobering, and moving stories of how New Yorkers experienced and confronted the challenges of “total war.”
Want to see everything—from lectures to films to behind-the-scenes stories—related to WWII & NYC? Click here to visit the WWII & NYC site!

Irving Boyer, Prospect Park, ca. 1942–1944. Oil on academy board. The New-York Historical Society, Gift of Selwyn L. Boyer, from the Boyer Family Collection, 2002.49

When war broke out in 1939, New York was a cosmopolitan, heavily immigrant city, whose people had real stakes in the global conflict and strongly held opinions about whether or not to intervene. The attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 brought the U.S. into the war, and New York became the principal port of embarkation for the warfront.

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Creative: Tronvig Group