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The Hirschfeld Century: The Art of Al Hirschfeld

May 22, 2015
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October 12, 2015

Al Hirschfeld (1903-2003) brought a set of visual conventions to the task of performance portraiture when he made his debut in 1926. His signature work, defined by a linear calligraphic style made his name a verb to be "Hirschfelded" was a sign that one has arrived. Now for the first time, nine decades of his art are collected in The Hirschfeld Century: The Art of Al Hirschfeld documenting Hirschfeld's life and career and, to a great extent, the history of the performing arts in the twentieth century and beyond.  

Al Hirschfeld (1903-2003), Ringo Starr in The Magic Christian. 1969, ink on board, Collection of the Al Hirschfeld Foundation

The Hirschfeld Century: The Art of Al Hirschfeld examines his influences, his iconography, and his techniques, from his earliest works to his last drawings. Visitors will have the opportunity to trace this unique artist's evolution by viewing his own body of work, including drawings, paintings, selections from sketchbooks, ephemera, and video. The exhibition is being organized in partnership with the Al Hirschfeld Foundation and is guest-curated by David Leopold, the Foundation's Archivist.

The Art of Al Hirschfeld was organized by Louise Kerz Hirschfeld, President of the Al Hirschfeld Foundation, and the New-York Historical Society, and was curated by David Leopold, Archivist of the Al Hirschfeld Foundation.

Leadership support for The Art of Al Hirschfeld has been provided by the The Al Hirschfeld Foundation, Lewis B. Cullman and Louise Kerz Hirschfeld, Edwin Schloss, and Janine Luke, in memory of Melvin Seidin.

Major support provided by Patty & Jay Baker Foundation, The Leo Kerz Family/Jonathan, Antony, Leslie & Grandchildren, Bernard & Irene Schwartz,  Sue Ann Weinberg; Lawrence B. Benenson, A G Foundation/Agnes Gund, The Robert and Joyce Menschel Family Foundation, Martin A. Packouz, and Jujamcyn Theaters/Jordan Roth & Paul Libin.

Additional support from Donal A. Pels Charitable Trust, The Jerome Robbins Foundation, Kathy Hayes, Alan & Betsy Cohn, Jamie DeRoy, The Ronald & Jo Carole Lauder Foundation, Cameron MacIntosh Foundation, The Dorothy Strelsin Foundation/Enid Nemy, Bruce E. Surry and Lynn Surry, Anita & Byron Wien, Larry Condon, Harry P. Kamen Family Foundation, and The Mortimer Levitt Foundation.

A Brief History of New York: Selections from A History of New York in 101 Objects

August 22, 2014
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November 30, 2014

Can one object define New York City? Can 101? New York Times urban affairs correspondent Sam Roberts has assembled a kaleidoscopic array of possibilities in a new book, A History of New York in 101 Objects. Featuring objects from the New-York Historical Society collection, this exhibition assembles some of Roberts’s choices, which together constitute a unique history of New York.  By turns provocative, iconic, and ironic, and winnowed from hundreds of possibilities, his selections share the criteria of having played some transformative role in the city’s history.

Tiffany & Co. (founded 1837), Sterling silver controller handle used to operate the first subway train, 1904. New-York Historical Society, 1922.103

Visitors to the New-York Historical Society may be familiar with many of the institution’s more important holdings which will be on view, and without which no exhibition about the history of the city would be complete. Among them are the water keg with which Governor DeWitt Clinton marked the opening of the Erie Canal in 1825; the draft wheel used during the 1863 draft riots, the largest civil uprising in American history; the sterling silver throttle that powered the inaugural trip of the New York City subway in 1904; and a jar of dust collected by N-YHS curators at Ground Zero following the 9/11 attacks. Less well-known selections include a seventeenth-century English–Low Dutch dictionary revealing linguistic traditions that persist to the present; a section of the transatlantic cable that first facilitated the intercontinental exchange of telegraphs in 1858; or a pair of shoes belonging to a young victim of the 1904 General Slocum steamboat tragedy, which until 9/11 was the city’s worst disaster.

Yet the city also can be described by far more ubiquitous objects that are no less unique to its DNA. The bubblegum pink Spaldeen ball, a staple of urban street games. The bagel, an unquestionably New York City food. Graffiti. The (now-extinct) subway token. The black-and-white cookie, which Roberts believes “democratically says New York,” because of its popularity at subway bakeries and elite establishments alike. Indeed, the selections themselves constitute a democracy of objects that taken together capture the monumental drama as well as the everyday spirit of an extraordinary city.
 

 

“I Live. Send Help.” 100 Years of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee

June 13, 2014
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September 21, 2014

The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) was founded in New York City in 1914 as a response to the plight of Jews in Europe and Palestine at the outset of World War I. Since then, JDC has become a premiere humanitarian organization helping Jews and non-Jews the world over in times of need. On the occasion of its 100 year anniversary, this exhibition will recount the history of the JDC from its creation by Jacob Schiff and Henry Morgenthau Sr. to its most recent relief activities rebuilding Jewish communities of the former Soviet Union and in aiding Filipinos in the wake of the devastation of Typhoon Haiyan. Included in this celebratory exhibition will be photographs, objects, and films that bring the JDC’s poignant stories to life.

Simchat Torah celebration in Romanian synagogue, Bucharest, 1969.

From Amsterdam to New Amsterdam

Speaker: 
Russell Shorto
Mon, 10/28/2013 - 18:30
Mon, October 28th, 2013 | 6:30 pm

Note: This program is sold out 

 

EVENT DETAILS

Almost 350 years after the short-lived Dutch rule came to an end on Manhattan, traces of “New Amsterdam” can still be found in everything from street names to the design of the official flag of New York City. Using the history of Amsterdam as a backdrop, critically acclaimed author Russell Shorto explains why we also have the Dutch to thank for some of New York’s most celebrated and enduring characteristics, including its cultural and religious diversity.

Price: 
$34
Members price: 
$20
Buy Tickets URL: 
node/104749
Sold out: 
0

The Civil War Draft Riots Walking Tour

Speaker: 
Barnet Schecter
Sat, 03/23/2013 - 11:00
Sat, March 23rd, 2013 | 11:00 am

Note: This event is sold out.

 

EVENT DETAILS

Join historian Barnet Schecter for an in-depth look at the festering racial and class conflicts that produced the deadliest riots in American history: the 1863 Draft Riots. Walking tours are limited to 35 guests per tour. Please buy tickets in advance.

SPEAKER BIO

Barnet Schecter is the author of George Washington’s America: A Biography Through His Maps and The Devil’s Own Work: The Civil War Draft Riots and the Fight to Reconstruct America.

Price: 
$30
Members price: 
$18
Buy Tickets URL: 
node/103730
Sold out: 
0

Those Angry Days: Roosevelt, Lindbergh, and America’s Fight Over World War II

Speaker: 
Lynne Olson
Tom Brokaw (moderator)
Thu, 03/28/2013 - 18:30
Thu, March 28th, 2013 | 6:30 pm

Note: This event is sold out.

 

EVENT DETAILS

At the center of the debate over American intervention in World War II were the two most famous men in America: President Franklin D. Roosevelt and aviator Charles Lindbergh. The stakes could not have been higher; the combatants were larger than life. Join us for a frank discussion of the bitter clash that divided the nation, with the future of democracy and the fate of the free world hanging in the balance.

Price: 
$30
Members price: 
$18
Buy Tickets URL: 
node/103708
Sold out: 
0

New York Magic with Matt Wayne

Speaker: 
Matt Wayne
Sat, 03/02/2013 - 19:00
Sat, March 2nd, 2013 | 7:00 pm

Note: This event has been cancelled

 

EVENT DETAILS

In a city where architecture seems to defy gravity and buildings appear and disappear in the blink of an eye, New York has long served as a premier venue for the world’s most renowned magicians. From Harry Houdini to Al Flosso to Jeff Sheridan, the city continues to attract and foster entertainers from around the world. In keeping with this tradition, New-York Historical presents an evening of dazzling fun with celebrity magician Matt Wayne.

Price: 
$30
Members price: 
$18
Sold out: 
0

WWII & NYC

October 23, 2012
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October 23, 2012

The Second World War (1939–1945) was the most widespread, destructive, and consequential conflict in history. WWII & NYC is an account of how New York and its metropolitan region contributed to Allied victory. The exhibition also explores the captivating, sobering, and moving stories of how New Yorkers experienced and confronted the challenges of “total war.”

When war broke out in 1939, New York was a cosmopolitan, heavily immigrant city, whose people had real stakes in the global conflict and strongly held opinions about whether or not to intervene. The attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 brought the U.S. into the war, and New York became the principal port of embarkation for the warfront. The presence of troops, the inflow of refugees, the wartime industries, the dispatch of fleets, and the dissemination of news and propaganda from media outlets, changed New York, giving its customary commercial and creative bustle a military flavor. Likewise, the landscape of the city acquired a martial air, as defenses in the harbor were bolstered, old forts were updated, and the docks became high security zones.

 

The Pop Shop: Education

September 18, 2012
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January 13, 2013

In honor of the installation of the ceiling from Keith Haring’s famous Pop Shop above the new admissions area in the Robert H. and Clarice Smith New York Gallery of American History, the New-York Historical Society, in collaboration with the Keith Haring Foundation, has created a rotating display devoted to the Pop Shop in the Henry Luce III Center for the Study of American Culture. The ceiling is a gift from the Haring Foundation, and all items in the Luce Center display are on loan from Foundation.

Keith Haring, Fill Your Head with Fun! Start Reading! Poster. 1988. Keith Haring artwork © Keith Haring Foundation

The latest of these displays to be installed, on view from September 18, 2012 through January 13, 2013, reflects on Keith Haring’s contributions to education, in particular his work in encouraging young people to read. On view will be posters, drawings and T-shirt designs by Haring, photographs by Adam Scull and Tseng Kwong Chi documenting the official launch of a Haring-designed campaign of public service advertisements, newspaper articles, a television interview with Haring, and one of the artist’s journals.

In 1986, with the encouragement of his friend and mentor Andy Warhol (1928–1987), internationally known New York artist Keith Haring (1958–1990) caused controversy by opening the Pop Shop in downtown Manhattan. Among Haring’s, and the Pop Shop’s, biggest fans were children: “There is nothing that makes me happier than making a child smile,” noted Haring in a 1988 journal entry. “The reason the “baby” has become my logo or signature is that it is the purest and most positive experience of human existence.” Throughout the 1980s Haring offered his services for education projects. In 1985 he created the poster for New York is Book Country, the famous annual book fair held on Fifth Avenue in support of the Children’s Services Division of the New York Public Library. Many of the best-known children’s authors including Charles Schulz, Maurice Sendak, and William Steig also donated their artwork for fair posters over the years—even as a fine artist, Haring’s work naturally paralleled theirs.

The Sidewalks of New York

Exhibitions: 
Highlight: 
0
Title:
The Sidewalks of New York
Date: 
1859
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Credit Line: 
New-York Historical Society, Purchase
Object Number: 
1983.39
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

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