Brooklyn Revealed

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Brooklyn Revealed offers a photographic tour of Brooklyn, through which visitors will learn about individual neighborhoods as well as the origin of more than 100 Brooklyn street names. The photographs, all of which come from the collections of the New-York Historical Society's Patricia D. Klingenstein Library, are paired with historical descriptions researched and written by New-York Historical's librarians. In instances where information about a specific street is inconclusive, visitors to the site are invited to submit their own ideas about how the street got its name. Visitors are also encouraged to submit the names of streets not included on the site.
 
Click here to view the full collection.
 

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Architectural Collections

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The Society's architectural collections include drawings, blueprints, renderings, photographs, correspondence, and business records. Most significant are its large holdings for individual architects or firms, including (in chronological order) John McComb, Jr.; Calvin Pollard; Alexander J. Davis; John B. Snook; George B. Post; McKim, Mead & White; and Cass Gilbert. These architects were all active in Manhattan and New York City buildings predominate, but their work includes many structures outside the city. More than 150 other locally and nationally prominent architects and engineers are also represented, generally by 10 or fewer drawings.

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Photograph Collections

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The extensive photograph collections are particularly strong in portraits and documentary images of New York-area buildings and street scenes from 1839 to 1945, although contemporary photography continues to be collected. The bulk of these images are arranged by location, or, for portraits, by sitter. Both professional and amateur photographers (many unidentified) are represented.

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Private Workshops

Private Professional Development

Professional development workshops are available on-site at the New-York Historical Society or museum staff can come to schools. Book one of the below content-based programs for your group of teachers today! All programs can be crafted as a two-hour workshop or extended to a half- or full-day program.

To schedule training for your school or for more information, contact us at teacherPD@nyhistory.org.

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Landmarks of New York

Apr 30 2009 - Jul 12 2009

An exhibition of 83 photographs documenting some of the most significant buildings and public parks in New York City will be on view at The New-York Historical Society from April 30 through July 12, 2009, in the exhibition Landmarks of New York. The exhibition has traveled to 82 countries under the sponsorship of the United States Department of State since 2006 and is now coming home to New York for its final showing. The photographs in the exhibition will then enter the collection of the New-York Historical Society, through a donation from the exhibition's curator, Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel. 

Brooklyn Bridge, 1867-83 Designated as a landmark August 24, 1967 Photograph by Laura Napier New-York Historical Society

An exhibition of 83 photographs documenting some of the most significant buildings and public parks in New York City will be on view at The New-York Historical Society from April 30 through July 12, 2009, in the exhibition Landmarks of New York. The exhibition has traveled to 82 countries under the sponsorship of the United States Department of State since 2006 and is now coming home to New York for its final showing.

Lincoln and New York

Oct 9 2009 - Mar 25 2010

Abraham Lincoln—the quintessential westerner—owed much of his national political success to his impact on the eastern state of New York—and, in turn, New York’s impact on him.

The Lincoln Family, ca. 1865, Francis Bicknell Carpenter, 1830-1900, Oil on canvas, Gift of Warren C. Crane, 1909.6

A New York Hanukkah

Nov 25 2011 - Jan 8 2012

Hanukkah lamps, or Hannukiot, are candelabra characterized by nine candle branches and used in the ritual candle-lighting associated with the celebration of Hanukkah, the festival that commemorates the 165 B.C.E. liberation of the Second Temple in Jerusalem. Hanukkah lamps were made up of eight oil wells or candle-holders, separated from a ninth traditionally used as a shamash, or server, to light the others. These lamps remain distinct from menorahs, which generally have seven candle branches and are not associated with a specific use or holiday. Hanukkah lamps were present in European synagogues by about the 13th century, and often designed in the form of menorahs or as standing table lamps.

Bernard Bernstein (b. 1928), Hanukkah lamp, 1999. Sterling silver. The New-York Historical Society, purchase, 2010.19

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