Museum Open Monday

The New-York Historical Society Museum will be open Monday, December 29, 10am-6pm. For details, please visit our calendar.

Camp History

March 25 through 28, 9am–4pm

Mon, March 25th, 2013 | 9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Tue, March 26th, 2013 | 9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Wed, March 27th, 2013 | 9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Thu, March 28th, 2013 | 9:00 am - 4:00 pm

March 25 through 28, 9am–4pm

 

Student Historian Program

Student Historian Program


“Through this internship, I learned to research more efficiently, think outside the box for creative projects and voice my opinions in group discussions.”
– Marcia White, 2012 Student Historian


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Titanic Sinks!: Commemorate the 100th Anniversary of one of the Twentieth-Century's Most Infamous Disasters

 Free with museum admission!

Sun, April 15th, 2012 | 2:00 pm

Experience the Titanic’s doomed voyage as Barry Denenberg, author of Titanic Sinks!, joins us in the Barbara K. Lipman Children's History Library to read excerpts and discuss his book for young readers. Questions surrounding the sinking of the Titanic will be certain to drive this discussion – questions about arrogance and corporate greed, questions about the lifeboats leaving half empty, questions about iceberg warning signs and questions about why so many third-class passengers perished. Join Mr.

You Are Here!

Sun, November 13th, 2011 | 11:30 am

Event Details

From the 17th century to the 21st, through fiction and through fact, hear tales of NYC and the people who made it great.

Explore wayfinding, a room-sized map, and what Manhattan looked like 400 years ago in these stories about maps.

Free with museum admission. Please check back for information on upcoming story tellers and stories.

Location

Barbara K. Lipman Children's Library, New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West, New York, NY 10024

Sunday Scholars

High school students from the New York City metropolitan area are invited to spend six Sunday afternoons examining art, artifacts and documents.

Sun, November 6th, 2011 | 1:00 pm

Event Details

Sundays, November 6, 13, 20 and December 4, 11, 18, 2011

Historians and Art Historians regularly come to the New-York Historical Society to conduct research. Now, budding scholars will have the chance to do the same. High school students from the New York City metropolitan area are invited to spend six Sunday afternoons examining art, artifacts and documents. Together, they will choose and research a topic in American History and create a video guide to the museum's collections for our website.

Examination Days: The New York African Free School Collection

In 1787, at a time when slavery was crucial to the prosperity and expansion of New York, the New York African Free School was created by the New York Manumission Society, a group dedicated to advocating for African-Americans. The school's explicit mission was to educate black children to take their place as equals to white American citizens.

It began as a single-room schoolhouse with about 40 students, the majority of whom were the children of slaves, and by the time it was absorbed into the New York City public school system in 1835, it had educated thousands of children, a number of whom went on to become well known in the United States and Europe. The New-York Historical Society’s New York African Free School Collection preserves a rich selection of student work and community commentary about the school.

Examination Days: The New York African Free School Collection

Teaser: 

In 1787 the New York Manumission Society created the African Free School with the primary goal of educating black children. It began as a single-room schoolhouse with about 40 students, the majority of whom were the children of slaves, and taught them a variety of practical subjects. By the time it was absorbed into the New York City public school system in 1835, it had educated thousands of children, including many who went on to become notable leaders.
With the support of the Russell Sage Foundation, the New-York Historical Society has launched a comprehensive website, showcasing actual examples of students’ work from 1816 through 1826, offering an unparalleled glimpse into the little-known history of African-American life in New York City in the late-18th and early-19th centuries as well as pedagogical techniques used at that time.
 
Click here to view the full collection.
 

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Creative: Tronvig Group