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The Great Game Uncle Sam at War with Spain

The Great Game Uncle Sam at War with Spain
The Great Game Uncle Sam at War with Spain
Title
The Great Game Uncle Sam at War with Spain
Date 
1898
Medium 
Cardboard, metal
Dimensions 
Box: 9 1/4 x 4 x 1 1/2 in. ( 23.5 x 10.2 x 3.8 cm ) Board: 20 1/2 x 20 1/2 x 1/8 in. ( 52.1 x 52.1 x 0.3 cm )
Description 
Board game with gameboard, playing pieces and box for the playing pieces; square board (folds in two) with lithographed illustrations of six American and six Spanish ships of war along the sides, the cities of Boston, Washington, New York, Morro Castle, Madrid and San Juan at the top and bottom, spaces in an oval around the center with maps of the Philippine Islands and Key West; board label inscribed "THE GREAT GAME/ UNCLE SAM/ AT/ WAR WITH SPAIN;" box cover label inscribed, "UNCLE SAM/ AT WAR WITH SPAIN/ Let the Americans show what they would have done had they/ been on Spanish War Vessels." playing pieces include two cardboard and metal spinners, 20 playing chips, two large indicators, and three die.
Credit Line 
The Liman Collection
Object Number 
2000.724
Marks 
lithographed: board label: "THE GREAT GAME/ UNCLE SAM/ AT/ WAR WITH SPAIN" lithographed: box label: box cover label inscribed, "UNCLE SAM/ AT WAR WITH SPAIN/ Let the Americans show what they would have done had they/ been on Spanish War Vessels./ COPYRIGHTED 1898 BY ROBERT BIRTWISTLE"
Gallery Label 
The title and subtext on this game ("let the Americans show what they would have done had they been on Spanish War Vessels") reflects the overbearing pride felt by Americans after their victory in the Spanish-American War. Like other games attuned to the war theme, Uncle Sam at War with Spain tried to capitalize on the nationalistic emotions dominating the yellow press.
Bibliography 
Hofer, Margaret K. "The Games We Played: The Golden Age of Board & Table Games." New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2003.
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.
Creative: Tronvig Group