The "Lord's Prayer": Silhouette

The "Lord's Prayer": Silhouette
The "Lord's Prayer": Silhouette
Title
The "Lord's Prayer": Silhouette
Date 
1828
Medium 
Beige paper cut-out, laid on black prepared paper
Dimensions 
frame: 5 5/8 x 6 1/2 x 1 in. ( 14.3 x 16.5 x 2.5 cm ) image: 3 3/4 x 4 3/4 in. ( 9.5 x 12.1 cm )
Description 
Silhouette: Text of the Lord's Prayer with stylized floral border cut from lightweight beige paper and affixed to hand-coated black paper; rectangular gilded frame.
Credit Line 
Gift of Miss Helen M. Turner, 1935
Object Number 
Z.2532
Marks 
inscription: lower center: "Cut with out Hands by / Martha Honeywell" inscription: on back: "In 1828 when my mother was / on a visit to her Parents in / New York she saw Martha / Honeywell cut without hands / the Lords Prayer from Tissue / Paper - / Mary D. Hancock / Grandaughter of John Pintard / Founder of the N.Y. Historical / Society." typewritten label: on back: "Gift of Miss Helen M. Turner / June 11, 1935 / Accessioned Dec. 13, 1939 (1)" printed label: on back: "From / R. Geduldiger. / 786 6th Ave. / Bet. 44th & 45th Sts." verso of mount: verso of old mount:"The Lord's Prayer/Cut by Martha Honeywell a/ young[?] girl born without arms,/ who used scissors with her toes as/ one would with their fingers-/Our mother was present/ when she cut it in New York/the summer of 1828-/My sister in law Mrs. Preston/told me the girl was born on/her farm near Louisville/MD Hancock
Inscriptions 
Inscribed at lower center on cut-out etiquette in brown ink: "Cut with out Hands by / Martha Honeywell"; verso of silhouette inscribed in brown ink: "The Lords Prayer / cut by Martha Honeywell a / [?]ing girl born without arms, / she used scissors with her toes as / one would with their fingers- / Our Mother was present / when she cut it in New York / the summer of 1828- / My sister in Law Mrs. Preston / told me the girl was born on / her farm near Louisville / M.D. Hancock / 1894"
Gallery Label 
Born without arms, the woman who cut this silhouette held the scissors in her teeth while the paper was supported on a table. For a while, she demonstrated her unusual skill at Barnum's Museum in New York City.
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.
Creative: Tronvig Group