Luce Center

Explore American history like never before through stunning exhibitions, captivating interactive media, and eye-opening programs at our new Luce Center. 

About the Luce Center


The new Henry Luce III Center on our renovated fourth floor is a groundbreaking educational experience for all, from first-time visitors to long-time Members. The first of its kind in the nation within the walls of a museum, the new Center for Women’s History uncovers the often overlooked contributions of women in American history through exhibitions, programs, multimedia, objects, and educational opportunities. A hub for scholarship, the cutting-edge center sets the stage for a new era of historical study. Our stunning Gallery of Tiffany Lamps offers visitors an awe-inspiring journey, highlighting 100 glowing glass lamps, many of which were designed by Clara Driscoll and the “Tiffany Girls” of her women’s Glasscutting Department. Our sprawling North Gallery showcases historic treasures from our permanent collection in a brand new way, telling the American story through interactive media and six soaring vertical glass cases.

Support the Luce Center


Help us present immersive exhibitions and educational programs at the new Luce Center where glimmering Tiffany lamps, never-before-seen collection treasures, and the groundbreaking Center for Women’s History set the stage for the future of the New-York Historical Society.

 

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The Campaign for New-York Historical Society 2013-2017

The New-York Historical Society gratefully acknowledges the many individuals and institutions who have helped us to secure our future as a preeminent center for American history. These supporters have strengthened our endowment, helped to establish the Center for Women’s History, and contributed vital capital funds to make possible the revitalization of the Henry Luce III Center.

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North Gallery 



Items from New-York Historical’s permanent collection find a new home in the North Gallery of our fourth-floor Henry Luce III Center for the Study of American Culture. Fifteen themed niches related to urban life—such as Recreation, Port, and Childhood—tell the dynamic story of American history, featuring objects as old as a copper and wooden globe from 1542 to those as new a door covered with more than 190 graffiti tags from in the 1970s. Six soaring vertical cases, packed densely with historic objects, and interactive digital elements such as touchscreens and tablets supplement the galleries and invite the visitor to delve deeper into the history of these storied objects. New-York Historical continues to actively collect artifacts from the present day through its “History Responds” program, and within the new Luce Center, visitors can use interactive stations to share suggestions about items from 21st century life that should be added to the collection for Museum visitors of the future.

Roy J. Zuckerberg Silver Gallery


The brilliantly glistening Silver Gallery features silver and jewelry by famed New York retailer Tiffany & Co., founded by Charles Tiffany, the father of Tiffany Studios’ Louis C. Tiffany. Items of note in this display include a colossal punch bowl presented in 1913 by Frank Woolworth to Cass Gilbert, architect of the Woolworth Building, on the occasion of its grand opening as the tallest building in the world; and a subway controller handle used by Mayor George McClellan to drive the first subway car on its maiden voyage in 1904 from City Hall, speeding uptown and flying through stations until the conductor grabbed the controls at 103rd Street. Other highlights of the Museum’s collection of early American silver include the earliest surviving New York teapot (1695) and work by celebrated colonial Jewish silversmith Myer Myers.

Creative: Tronvig Group