Did you miss one of New-York Historical's recent public programs? Recordings of select programs are available here as streaming audio.

Podcasts of select programs are also available on New-York Historical’s iTunes U library. These files can easily be downloaded and played on any Mac, PC or portable device and even burned to a CD.

April 2011
Audio
Justice Brennan: Liberal Champion
April 12th, 2011
55 min 2 seconds
Seth Stern
Stephen Wermiel
Jeffrey Toobin (Moderator)

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Three experts draw back the curtain of the United States Supreme Court to provide an insider’s look at one of the most influential and distinguished justices of the 20th century: William J. Brennan, Jr.

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April 2011
Audio
The First Shot: 1861
April 7th, 2011
1 Hour and 13 minutes
James M. McPherson
Craig L. Symonds
Adam Goodheart
Harold Holzer (Moderator)

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A century and a half after Confederate forces fired on Fort Sumter to ignite the Civil War, leading historians examine the causes of the conflict.

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April 2011
Audio
Hero: The Life and Legend of Lawrence of Arabia
April 4th, 2011
1 hour and 39 minutes
Michael Korda
Henry Kissinger
Adam Gopnik (Moderator)

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Michael Korda, Henry Kissinger and Adam Gopnik discuss the life of T. E. Lawrence—separating fact from legend—and examine the impact of Lawrence’s activities on modern politics in the Middle East and on world history.

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March 2011
Audio
Franklin, Eleanor and the Four Freedoms
March 31st, 2011
56 min 10 sec
William J. vanden Heuvel
William E. Leuchtenburg
Douglas Brinkley (Moderator)

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In his State of the Union Address on January 6, 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt looked forward to a world in which everyone enjoyed four essention freedoms: freedom of speech and expression, freedom of worship, freedom from want and freedom from fear. These values were central to both Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, who made it her personal mission to codify those rights in the United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Experts discuss the speech and its far-reaching influence, and also delve into this extraordinary couple's influence on one another.

 

William E. Leuchtenburg is a professor emeritus at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a former Bancroft Prize winner and the author of six books on FDR. Hazel Rowley is the author of several books, including Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: An Extraordinary Marriage. William J. vanden Heuvel is Chairman of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, LLC, as well as Founder and Chair Emeritus of the Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute. Douglas Brinkley (Moderador) is a professor of history at Rice University and a fellow in history at the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy. He is a member of the board of the Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute.

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March 2011
Audio
Why Brandeis Matters
March 21st, 2011
58 min 18 sec
Jeffrey Rosen
Frederick M. Lawrence (Moderator)

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He was a fierce advocate for workers' rights, a pioneer in pro bono work by attorneys and one of the most distinguished justices in the history of the United States Supreme Court. Louis D. Brandeis is a giant figure in American history and his influence can be felt beyond the ralm of law. As a young lawyer and reformer, he was instrumental in the battles against monopolies and for minimum wage/maximum hour regulations for laborers, and was co-author of "The Right to Privacy," one of the most important law articles in history. As Associate Supreme Court Justice, he was a powerful—though often minority—voice in defense of civil liberties and his dissents paved the way for many future reforms. In this program, two speakers discuss Brandeis's continued relevance and the impact of his life and work.

 

Jeffrey Rosen is a professor of law at The George Washington University and the legal affairs editor of The New Republic. His most recent book is The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries that Defined America. Frederick M. Lawrence (Moderator) is the new president of Brandeis University, former Dean of The George Washington University Law School and the author of Punishing Hate: Bias Crimes Under American Law.

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Creative: Tronvig Group